Granny patrol

Granny adores a browse thing. Some cool links worth perusing:

  • Reading books might help you read minds, a brief overview of "Theory of Mind" research reported on The School Of Life's blog. Reading makes you a better person? Thank Christ for that, otherwise I just read the complete works of Harlan Coben for nothing. Come to think of it, I already have this superpower, I read everybody's mind all the time. Like when someone says to me "I love your work", they're actually thinking "Jesus, make it stop". I know this. 
Harlan Coben has written a lot of detective novels and I've read them all. Good trade.

Harlan Coben has written a lot of detective novels and I've read them all. Good trade.

  •  This article from The Guardian, "Don't stop daydreaming – it sets your mind to work". Oh, so I'm working when I swan about my exhibition at the Gagosian & I'm wearing that electric blue outfit from Net-a-Porter with the gorgeous boots from Balenciaga & the most amazing vintage Opal cocktail ring & the critical acclaim is mine all mine& it's all just so COOL. Got it.
  • Infographics: really smart people who'd rather be making pictures than doing mathsing make data graphics to help really unsmart people understand the mathsing. Pictures are always better. Below is an amaaaazing info-textile by KRAM/WEISSHAAR exhibited in Hanover.
Contemporary data-driven innovation is represented and visualised as a massive repository of human culture and activity, able to tackle and articulate the complexity, breadth and depth of the information available within virtual spaces. A 3.000 square meter, floor-to-ceiling terapixel graphic makes manifest the largesse of Big Data, the theme of this year's CODE_n. The designers imagine systems beyond human perception and use custom code to plot massive amounts of data on spectacular canvases.

Contemporary data-driven innovation is represented and visualised as a massive repository of human culture and activity, able to tackle and articulate the complexity, breadth and depth of the information available within virtual spaces. A 3.000 square meter, floor-to-ceiling terapixel graphic makes manifest the largesse of Big Data, the theme of this year's CODE_n. The designers imagine systems beyond human perception and use custom code to plot massive amounts of data on spectacular canvases.

Scary Deathstar looking infographic, on about the same scale as a Deathstar and everything. See? Scary.

Scary Deathstar looking infographic, on about the same scale as a Deathstar and everything. See? Scary.

  • Am delighted with my discovery of Barnes' mould box. Yay! Its better than when I discovered ready-grated cheese. Obviously I'm way too cheap to actually buy one of these (price!) but I would love to have one even though it proves I'm incredibly lazy and moneywasty. But I like to think that my searching up mould boxes in the first place counts for something, even if I do buy ready grated cheese.
  • Then, my dear reader (note, that was "reader", yes; I know there's one of you out there so pay attention, its all for you. You're welcome.), I examined every single finalist for the last 62 years of the Blake Prize exhibition and if that isn't a deep and abiding commitment to admiration (envy) and covetousness (jealousy), I don't know what is. Although that's a boundary I'm prepared to push. Welcome to the barricades, friend.
  • During this in depth critique of other people's hard work and spirituality, I had opportunity to behold the beautiful work of Tony Clark. Which is just wonderful. For serious, it's beautiful and I love it.
Section from Clark’s Myriorama 2012, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Section from Clark’s Myriorama 2012, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Sections from Clark’s Myriorama 2012, synthetic polymer paint and permanent marker ink  on canvas boards

Sections from Clark’s Myriorama 2012, synthetic polymer paint and permanent marker ink 
on canvas boards

  • So obviously I then read about Myriorama. Great device. Brilliant really, a common horizon line in every piece, Tony Clark has used this pictorial devise over the last 30 or more years of his work. That's a powerful notion.
  • Furthermore, I shall henceforth use "synthetic polymer paint" when describing artwork media, instead of the infinitely pedestrian "acrylic". Much better obfuscating, am pleased with that.
  • Moving on briskly and naturally to pretty things to wear on my head, I totally fell for the headpieces of Masterpeace by Evgeniya Linovich.
From Moda Operandi.

From Moda Operandi.

One is currently fashioning one's own headpiece, check this space for exciting headpiece updates, theres bound to be more chance of me finishing one of these than completing any of the 400 or so half baked artworks currently covering every surface in the studio..

  • Whist I was buggering around with fabric (slow in the studio lately) I made this sort of tunic utilising a circular batik print tablecloth and a scrap of Missoni knit. I was curious to see how the circular pattern worked out. Meh. Is ok-ish but I think I'll crop it off, the black & white chevron is too bright., although it works as a black & white image better than colour, so that's something to think about. I should have another go at this; having cut a tshirt shape hole in my tablecloth already, it seems irresponsible not to. But I've kinda lost interest in it now. This happens a lot; it's diverting to do some sewing, but I have to be cosmically aligned or it just doesn't appeal. 
  • On the subject (sort of) of adornments, segue to L'wren Scott. She died badly. Phillip Seymour Hoffman and our own (Aussie) Charlotte Dawson also made their own ends recently, but it's L'wren that I cant stop thinking about. She was not a force for societal change, like Charlotte, or a tortured soul like Phillip, L'wren did Fashion. Capital F. I loved her for that, she did it so well. I loved her sexy librarian look, her demure yet so cool womanly designs, her killer silhouette & attention to beautiful details, but I really loved that she was mad for vintage jewelry most of all. She was a serious collector and I love that she did it quietly, for herself, & that beneath the disposable-ness of the fashion, the shoes and the jackets, she wanted beautiful things that had lasted, she wanted lasting gorgeousness. Moreover, she was prepared to spend properly on these shiny solid pieces of decoration and for that, abiding respekt. So let us now choose, say, three items to have right now, in her honor, from the new finds pages at Jewel Diva, my favorite vintage jewelry store in New York. We're doing this for L'wren, yo.

The rules of this game never change except for this one time; because L'wren would never have stopped at one so just for this game its an extravagant three. Game otherwise always goes like this: look in a tasty store window & select ONE item that I HAVE to HAVE, like its a rule that I have to have something and cant go home without making my selection. I HAVE TO choose one, even though it may be (definitely will be) so pricey that I can't afford 5 minutes of time with any chosen piece. I pretend its for real and kinda a bit of a chore, settling for the one piece. That's it, that's the game & its a weirdly satisfying game to play; in this way, I have cased window displays all over the world, amassing a vast collection of my own. So I can wear them while I'm *working*. 

Closing with a song.